News Ticker

May Construction Unemployment Improves

Credit: Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc.

Source: Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc.

Construction unemployment rates improved in 46 states and throughout the nation in May on a year-over-year basis, according to an analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics data released today by Associated Builders and Contractors. The May national not seasonally adjusted (NSA) construction unemployment rate of 5.2 percent was 1.5 percent lower than a year ago while the industry employed 213,000 more people than in May 2015.

Only three states—Pennsylvania, North Dakota and South Dakota—had their May estimated construction unemployment rate increase from a year ago, while Texas had no change in its rate from May 2015. The year-over-year increase for Pennsylvania and South Dakota was small, up 0.1 percent. All states had construction unemployment rates under 10 percent, an occurrence last observed in July 2015.

View states ranked by their construction unemployment rate, their year-over-year improvement in construction employment and monthly improvement in construction employment.

View each state’s unemployment rate for all industries.

The Top Five States

The five states with the lowest construction unemployment rates in order from lowest rate to highest were:

  1. Idaho
  2. Nebraska
  3. Minnesota
  4. Wyoming
  5. Vermont

Only the top two states—Idaho and Nebraska—were also among the top five in April. Idaho, with a 1.9 percent estimated construction unemployment rate, had the lowest rate among the states in May. That was up from third lowest rate in April.

View the regional breakdown of the construction unemployment rates of each state.

The Bottom Five States

The five states with the highest construction unemployment rates (from lowest to highest) were:

  1. Illinois
  2. Pennsylvania
  3. Alabama
  4. Rhode Island
  5. New Mexico

Four of the five states (all except Alabama) with the highest estimated construction unemployment rates in May were the same as in April, although in a different order.

Read more at abc.org

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*